Secret Stone Garden – A Connecticut Treasure

i have always known i was an artsy city girl, yet I grew up in the suburbs, and I’ve somehow ended up in the suburbs.  While I wait for my exciting new life in Charlotte or Denver, I do not want to miss, or dismiss, the beauty, fun and excitement occurring right in my own back yard.

Just before the school year starts, we are home to the Wolcott Country Fair – just a quick walk and we can feed the cutest little goats and enjoy all the sticky fried greasy doughy treats we could ask for.  There is a freeky flock of grackles that lands in our yard once a year for about 5 or 10 minutes, and then swoosh.. they’re off.  In the lower yard there is a vernal pool (aka very special swampy wetland) that has been destination spot to hundreds of (probably very horny) orange spotted salamanders that come there on the first warm rainy night of the spring to perpetuate their species.  Once on a snowy morning before sunrise, I caught a mamma dear and her baby nibbling on the pine trees outside my studio.  The families of northern cardinals and woodpeckers that visit our garden can entertain me (and Stewie and Olive) for hours. I’ve seen rainbows from my porch, pink and purple sunsets through the trees. We share our home with bunnies, owls, butterflies, tiny frogs.  What could be more magical?

One day my husband brought me out on his atv for a bumpy, muddy ride into the woods behind our house.  We rode for about 15 minutes then we stopped, ignition off.  Shhh, so quiet, just the us, the woods,sunbeams… and stones.  Piles and stacks of stones.  Not in random, messy piles, but in lovely mystical gravity defying piles. Who put these here?  How old are they?  What do they mean?  Well, we’re still not entirely sure, and we may never know.  But for now, lets just look at them together, and enjoy this beautiful secret treasure in our own back yard.

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e.j.l. xo

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2 thoughts on “Secret Stone Garden – A Connecticut Treasure

  1. I once saw a documentary on The History Channel which described those stone piles, but I can’t remember much about it. I wish I could recall the show’s title, for you could look it up on their website. I can’t recall the origins of the stones, either, only that some archaeology students were examining that site. My first guess, though, would be that they were made by American Indians. As for their purpose, well, that is probably as mysterious as the hilly mounds left by several tribes all across the eastern, midwestern, and southern U.S.

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